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The protestant episcopal church, black nationalists, and expansion of the west african missionary field, 1851–1871

Oldfield, J. R.

Authors



Abstract

One of the most boldly conceived assaults on benighted Africa during the nineteenth century was that undertaken by mainline Protestant denominations in the United States. With the brash confidence characteristic of the age, hundreds of American missionaries were dispatched from New York and Baltimore to convert the heathen tribes of Africa and wrest a continent from ruin. If the experience of the Protestant Episcopal church is at all typical, however, these efforts not infrequently aroused suspicion and open hostility. In fact, Episcopal penetration of Liberia in the second half of the second century was remarkable for a long and bitter contest with black nationalists who were intent on using the church as a vehicle for their own personal and racial ambitions.

Citation

Oldfield, J. R. (1988). The protestant episcopal church, black nationalists, and expansion of the west african missionary field, 1851–1871. Church History: Studies in Christianity and Culture, 57(1), 31-45. https://doi.org/10.2307/3165901

Journal Article Type Article
Online Publication Date Jul 28, 2009
Publication Date 1988-03
Deposit Date Nov 17, 2020
Journal Church History: Studies in Christianity and Culture
Print ISSN 0009-6407
Electronic ISSN 1755-2613
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 57
Issue 1
Pages 31-45
DOI https://doi.org/10.2307/3165901
Public URL https://hull-repository.worktribe.com/output/3623535
Publisher URL https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/church-history/article/abs/protestant-episcopal-church-black-nationalists-and-expansion-of-the-west-african-missionary-field-18511871/3EE9A8885BEB758DE9713A240A30F994