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Functional relationship between skull form and feeding mechanics in Sphenodon, and implications for diapsid skull development

Curtis, Neil; Jones, Marc E. H.; Shi, Junfen; O'Higgins, Paul; Evans, Susan E.; Fagan, Michael J.

Authors

Neil Curtis

Marc E. H. Jones

Junfen Shi

Paul O'Higgins

Susan E. Evans



Abstract

The vertebrate skull evolved to protect the brain and sense organs, but with the appearance of jaws and associated forces there was a remarkable structural diversification. This suggests that the evolution of skull form may be linked to these forces, but an important area of debate is whether bone in the skull is minimised with respect to these forces, or whether skulls are mechanically

Citation

Curtis, N., Jones, M. E. H., Shi, J., O'Higgins, P., Evans, S. E., & Fagan, M. J. (2011). Functional relationship between skull form and feeding mechanics in Sphenodon, and implications for diapsid skull development. PloS one, 6(12), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0029804

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Dec 5, 2011
Online Publication Date Dec 28, 2011
Publication Date Dec 28, 2011
Deposit Date Nov 13, 2014
Publicly Available Date Nov 13, 2014
Journal PLoS ONE
Print ISSN 1932-6203
Electronic ISSN 1932-6203
Publisher Public Library of Science
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 6
Issue 12
Article Number ARTN e29804
DOI https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0029804
Keywords General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology; General Agricultural and Biological Sciences; General Medicine
Public URL https://hull-repository.worktribe.com/output/467142
Publisher URL http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0029804
Copyright Statement © 2011 Curtis et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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Copyright Statement
© 2011 Curtis et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.



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