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Cardiovascular and musculoskeletal response to supervised exercise in patients with intermittent claudication (PREDICT) (2018)
Journal Article
Harwood, A. E., Totty, J. P., Pymer, S., Huang, C., Hitchman, L., Carradice, D., …Chetter, I. C. (in press). Cardiovascular and musculoskeletal response to supervised exercise in patients with intermittent claudication (PREDICT). Journal of vascular surgery, doi:10.1016/j.jvs.2018.10.065

Objective Intermittent claudication occurs in 20 % of the population over 70 and treatment includes a supervised exercise programme (SEP). Whilst there is evidence demonstrating walking improvements following a SEP there is conflicting data on the ph... Read More

Preferred exercise modalities in patients with intermittent claudication (2018)
Journal Article
Harwood, A., Hitchman, L. H., Ingle, L., Doherty, P., & Chetter, I. C. (2018). Preferred exercise modalities in patients with intermittent claudication. Journal of Vascular Nursing, 36(2), 81-84. doi:10.1016/j.jvn.2017.12.002

Conventional supervised exercise programs (SEPs) for claudicants are traditionally based on time-constrained, group-based structured programs usually at a hospital site. Uptake of an SEP is poor, despite the high-level evidence demonstrating its clin... Read More

Dialkylcarbamoyl chloride (DACC)-coated dressings in the management and prevention of wound infection: A systematic review (2017)
Journal Article
Totty, J., Bua, N., Smith, G., Harwood, A., Carradice, D., Wallace, T., & Chetter, I. (2017). Dialkylcarbamoyl chloride (DACC)-coated dressings in the management and prevention of wound infection: A systematic review. Journal of Wound Care, 26(3), 107-114. doi:10.12968/jowc.2017.26.3.107

Objective: Dialkylcarbomoyl chloride (DACC)-coated dressings (Leukomed Sorbact and Cutimed Sorbact) irreversibly bind bacteria at the wound surface that are then removed when the dressing is changed. They are a recent addition to the wound care profe... Read More