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‘We do it to keep him alive’: bereaved individuals’ experiences of online suicide memorials and continuing bonds (2015)
Journal Article
Kennedy, D., Bailey, L., & Bell, J. (2015). ‘We do it to keep him alive’: bereaved individuals’ experiences of online suicide memorials and continuing bonds. Mortality, 20(4), (375-389). doi:10.1080/13576275.2015.1083693. ISSN 1357-6275

This paper presents draws on interviews with individuals who have experience of creating, maintaining and utilising Facebook sites in memory of a loved one who has died by suicide. We argue that Facebook enables the deceased to be an on-going active... Read More

Continuing social presence of the dead: Exploring suicide bereavement through online memorialisation (2014)
Journal Article
Kennedy, D., Bailey, L., & Bell, J. (2015). Continuing social presence of the dead: Exploring suicide bereavement through online memorialisation. The new review of hypermedia and multimedia, 21(1-2), (72-86). doi:10.1080/13614568.2014.983554. ISSN 1361-4568

© 2014 The Author(s). The last 10 years have seen a rise in Internet sites commemorating those lost to suicide. These sites describe the life of the deceased and the afterlife of relatives, parents, friends or siblings who have been termed the "forgo... Read More

'Under a shower of bird-notes': R. S. Thomas's elegiac poems for Elsi (2014)
Journal Article
Kennedy, D. (2014). 'Under a shower of bird-notes': R. S. Thomas's elegiac poems for Elsi. English, 63(243), (296-312). doi:10.1093/english/efu018. ISSN 0013-8215

It has been customary to see elegies by male poets as exceptional rather than typical poems. W. H. Auden wrote that ‘Poets seem to be more generally successful at writing elegies than at any other literary genre’. Peter Sacks reads Milton’s ‘Lycidas’... Read More

'Open secrets': Masculine subjectivity and other men's bodies in some late twentieth-century British poetry (2011)
Journal Article
Kennedy, D. (2011). 'Open secrets': Masculine subjectivity and other men's bodies in some late twentieth-century British poetry. Textual Practice, 25(1), (87-107). doi:10.1080/0950236X.2011.537551. ISSN 0950-236X

Stephen Heath has asked in 'Male Feminism', 'Do I write male? What does that mean?' Contemporary British poetry likes to imagine itself as ideologically innocent, particularly in terms of male subjectivity and masculinity. Masculinity becomes, theref... Read More