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Human embryos from overweight and obese women display phenotypic and metabolic abnormalities (2014)
Journal Article
Leary, C., Leese, H. J., & Sturmey, R. G. (2015). Human embryos from overweight and obese women display phenotypic and metabolic abnormalities. Human Reproduction, 30(1), 122-132. doi:10.1093/humrep/deu276

STUDY QUESTION Is the developmental timing and metabolic regulation disrupted in embryos from overweight or obese women? SUMMARY ANSWER Oocytes from overweight or obese women are smaller than those from women of healthy weight, yet post-fertilization... Read More

Metabolic heterogeneity during preimplantation development: The missing link? (2014)
Journal Article
Leese, H. J., Sturmey, R. G., & Brison, D. R. (2014). Metabolic heterogeneity during preimplantation development: The missing link?. Human Reproduction Update, 20(5), 632-640. doi:10.1093/humupd/dmu018

BACKGROUND Most tissues in the body rely on the presence of gap junctions in order to couple their component cells electrically and metabolically via intercellular transport of ions, metabolites and signalling agents. As a result, cells within tissue... Read More

Amino acid metabolism of bovine blastocysts: A biomarker of sex and viability (2010)
Journal Article
Sturmey, R. G., Bermejo-Alvarez, P., Gutierrez-Adan, A., Rizos, D., Leese, H. J., & Lonergan, P. (2010). Amino acid metabolism of bovine blastocysts: A biomarker of sex and viability. Molecular Reproduction and Development, 77(3), 285-296. doi:10.1002/mrd.21145

The ratio of male/female embryos may be modified by environmental factors such as maternal diet in vivo and the composition of embryo culture media in vitro. We have used amino acid profiling, a noninvasive marker of developmental potential to compar... Read More

DNA damage and metabolic activity in the preimplantation embryo (2008)
Journal Article
Leese, H. J., Sturmey, R. G., Barker, E. A., & Hawkhead, J. A. (2009). DNA damage and metabolic activity in the preimplantation embryo. Human Reproduction, 24(1), (81-91). doi:10.1093/humrep/den346. ISSN 0268-1161

BACKGROUND: Embryos with greater viability have a lower or 'quieter' amino acid metabolism than those which arrest. We have hypothesized this is due to non-viable embryos possessing greater cellular/molecular damage and consuming more nutrients, such... Read More