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Tissue iron promotes wound repair via M2 macrophage polarisation and the chemokines CCL17 and CCL22 (2019)
Journal Article
Wilkinson, H. N., Roberts, E. R., Stafford, A. R., Banyard, K. L., Matteucci, P., Mace, K. A., & Hardman, M. J. (2019). Tissue iron promotes wound repair via M2 macrophage polarisation and the chemokines CCL17 and CCL22. American Journal of Pathology, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajpath.2019.07.015

Macrophages are important for effective iron recycling and erythropoiesis, but they also play a crucial role in wound healing, orchestrating tissue repair. Recently, we demonstrated a significant accumulation of iron in healing wounds and a requireme... Read More about Tissue iron promotes wound repair via M2 macrophage polarisation and the chemokines CCL17 and CCL22.

Reduced iron in diabetic wounds: An oxidative stress-dependent role for STEAP3 in extracellular matrix deposition and remodelling (2019)
Journal Article
Wilkinson, H. N., Upson, S. E., Banyard, K. L., Knight, R., Mace, K. A., & Hardman, M. J. (2019). Reduced iron in diabetic wounds: An oxidative stress-dependent role for STEAP3 in extracellular matrix deposition and remodelling. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 139(11), 2368-2377.e7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jid.2019.05.014

Iron is crucial for maintaining normal bodily function, with well-documented roles in erythropoiesis, haemostasis and inflammation. Despite this, little is known about the temporal regulation of iron during wound healing, nor how iron contributes to... Read More about Reduced iron in diabetic wounds: An oxidative stress-dependent role for STEAP3 in extracellular matrix deposition and remodelling.

Elevated local senescence in diabetic wound healing is linked to pathological repair via CXCR2. (2019)
Journal Article
Wilkinson, H. N., Clowes, C., Banyard, K. L., Matteuci, P., Mace, K., & Hardman, M. J. (2019). Elevated local senescence in diabetic wound healing is linked to pathological repair via CXCR2. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 139(5), 1171-1181.e6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jid.2019.01.005

Cellular senescence can be broadly defined as a stable, yet essentially irreversible, loss of proliferative capacity. Historically, senescence is described as a negative outcome of advanced cellular age. It is now clear, however, that senescence repr... Read More about Elevated local senescence in diabetic wound healing is linked to pathological repair via CXCR2..


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