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Ruin and reformation in Spenser, Shakespeare, and Marvell (2019)
Book
Mottram, S. (2019). Ruin and reformation in Spenser, Shakespeare, and Marvell. Oxford University Press (OUP)

Ruin and Reformation in Spenser, Shakespeare, and Marvell explores writerly responses to the religious violence of the long reformation in England and Wales, spanning over a century of literature and history, from the establishment of the national ch... Read More about Ruin and reformation in Spenser, Shakespeare, and Marvell.

The religious geography of Marvell’s “An Horatian Ode”: popery, presbytery, and parti-coloured picts (2018)
Journal Article
Mottram, S. (2018). The religious geography of Marvell’s “An Horatian Ode”: popery, presbytery, and parti-coloured picts. Seventeenth Century, 33(4), 441-461. https://doi.org/10.1080/0268117X.2018.1484636

Marvell’s “Ode” (1650) is an English poem about a British problem – a problem further problematized by religion. The “Ode” lauds Cromwell’s Irish and Scottish campaigns, but English responses to these “colonial” wars were in reality complicated by pr... Read More about The religious geography of Marvell’s “An Horatian Ode”: popery, presbytery, and parti-coloured picts.

“With guiltles blood oft stained”: Spenser’s Ruines of Time and the Saints of St. Albans (2018)
Journal Article
Mottram, S. (2018). “With guiltles blood oft stained”: Spenser’s Ruines of Time and the Saints of St. Albans. Spenser studies, 31(1), 533-556. https://doi.org/10.1086/694442

Alban is conspicuously absent from Spenser’s Ruines of Time. Although Camden writes that Verulamium was “famous for […] bringing foorth Alban,” Spenser’s Verlame is silent on Alban and again departs from Camden to claim Verulamium had been built on t... Read More about “With guiltles blood oft stained”: Spenser’s Ruines of Time and the Saints of St. Albans.

Spenser’s Dutch uncles: The family of love and the four translations of a theatre for worldlings (2014)
Book Chapter
Mottram, S. (2014). Spenser’s Dutch uncles: The family of love and the four translations of a theatre for worldlings. In J. Maria Perez Fernandez, & E. Wilson-Lee (Eds.), Translation and the Book Trade in Early Modern Europe, 164-184. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139942393.009

© José María Pérez Fernández and Edward Wilson-Lee 2014. A Theatre for Worldlings is a milestone work in more ways than one. Commonly regarded as the first English emblem book, it is “always to be remembered as containing the first printed verse of E... Read More about Spenser’s Dutch uncles: The family of love and the four translations of a theatre for worldlings.

Writing Wales, from the Renaissance to Romanticism (2012)
Book
Mottram, S., & Prescott, S. (2012). S. Prescott, & S. Mottram (Eds.), Writing Wales, from the Renaissance to Romanticism. London: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Writing Wales explores representations of Wales in English and Welsh literatures written across a broad sweep of history, from the union of Wales with England in 1536 to the beginnings of its industrialization at the turn of the nineteenth century. T... Read More about Writing Wales, from the Renaissance to Romanticism.

Introduction (2012)
Book Chapter
Mottram, S., & Prescott, S. (2012). Introduction. In S. Mottram, & S. Prescott (Eds.), Writing Wales, from the Renaissance to Romanticism, 1-20. Ashgate

An Empire of itself: Arthur as icon of an English Empire, 1509-1547 (2008)
Book Chapter
Mottram, S. (2008). An Empire of itself: Arthur as icon of an English Empire, 1509-1547. Arthurian Literature, 153 - 174. D.S. Brewer

This article responds to recent studies that have applied to early modern English literature the aims of the ‘new British history’, which seeks to bridge the divide between anglocentric and anglophobic approaches to Britain’s past.... Read More about An Empire of itself: Arthur as icon of an English Empire, 1509-1547.