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Caught between the orientalist–occidentalist polemic: gender mainstreaming as feminist transformation or neocolonial subversion? (2017)
Journal Article
Clisby, S., & Enderstein, A. (2017). Caught between the orientalist–occidentalist polemic: gender mainstreaming as feminist transformation or neocolonial subversion?. International Feminist Journal of Politics, 19(2), 231-246. doi:10.1080/14616742.2016.1258262

Here we provide a critical reading of gender mainstreaming as a potential emancipatory force that has been co-opted within Orientalist-Occidentalist polemics. This remains a critical period in the “mainstreaming” debate, where feminist reappropriatio... Read More

Feminist journeys : travelling through at 25 years of feminism with the Journal of gender studies (2016)
Journal Article
Clisby, S., & Lennon, K. (2016). Feminist journeys : travelling through at 25 years of feminism with the Journal of gender studies. Journal of gender studies,

In this introductory article we provide a contextual theoretical framework of feminist debates and movements through the lens of the Journal of Gender Studies over the course of the past quarter of a century. Attention to the processes by which we be... Read More

Naturalising distinctions: the contested field of environmental relations in Costa Rica (2009)
Journal Article
Johnson, M., & Clisby, S. (2009). Naturalising distinctions: the contested field of environmental relations in Costa Rica. Landscape research, 34(2), 171-187. doi:10.1080/01426390802390517

This paper draws on Bourdieu's notion of 'the field', a contested domain of relations of power, as a way to think about the social relations of environmentalism. More specifically, we suggest that talk about the environment and its protection is an i... Read More

Both 'One' and 'Other': Environmental Cosmopolitanism and the Politics of Hybridity in Costa Rica (2008)
Journal Article
Johnson, M., & Clisby, S. (2008). Both 'One' and 'Other': Environmental Cosmopolitanism and the Politics of Hybridity in Costa Rica. Nature and Culture, 3(1), 63 - 81. doi:10.3167/nc.2008.030105

Cosmopolitans are frequently characterized as living and perceiving the world and their environment from a distance. Drawing on ethnographic work among a small group of Western migrants in Costa Rica, we complicate this portrayal in a number of ways.... Read More