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Why would a special FM process exist in adults, when it does not appear to exist in children? (2019)
Journal Article
O’Connor, R. J., Lindsay, S., Mather, E., & Riggs, K. J. (2019). Why would a special FM process exist in adults, when it does not appear to exist in children?. Cognitive neuroscience, 10(4), 221-222. https://doi.org/10.1080/17588928.2019.1574260

Cooper Greve, and Henson (this issue)  caution restraint before accepting that a fast mapping (FM) process exists in adults. We welcome this, but would also add that the original rationale for studying FM in adults is not currently supported by devel... Read More

Transcranial magnetic stimulation over left inferior frontal and posterior temporal cortex disrupts gesture-speech integration (2018)
Journal Article
Zhao, W., Riggs, K., Schindler, I., & Holle, H. (2018). Transcranial magnetic stimulation over left inferior frontal and posterior temporal cortex disrupts gesture-speech integration. Journal of Neuroscience, 38(8), 1891-1900. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1748-17.2017

Language and action naturally occur together in the form of co-speech gestures and there is now convincing evidence that listeners display a strong tendency to integrate semantic information from both domains during comprehension. A contentious quest... Read More

A brighter future : the effect of positive episodic simulation on future predictions in non-depressed, moderately dysphoric & highly dysphoric individuals (2017)
Journal Article
Boland, J., Riggs, K. J., & Anderson, R. J. (2018). A brighter future : the effect of positive episodic simulation on future predictions in non-depressed, moderately dysphoric & highly dysphoric individuals. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 100, 7-16. doi:10.1016/j.brat.2017.10.010

Previous research suggests depressed individuals have difficulties with future directed cognitions. For instance, compared with non-depressed individuals, they predict positive events are less likely to occur. Recent work suggests that episodic simul... Read More

Counter-intuitive moral judgement following traumatic brain injury (2017)
Journal Article
Rowley, D. A., Rogish, M., Alexander, T., & Riggs, K. J. (2018). Counter-intuitive moral judgement following traumatic brain injury. Journal of neuropsychology, 12(2), 200-215. https://doi.org/10.1111/jnp.12117

Several neurological patient populations, including Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), appear to produce an abnormally ‘utilitarian’ pattern of judgements to moral dilemmas; they tend to make judgements that maximise the welfare of the majority, rather th... Read More

Defending simulation theory against the argument from error (2016)
Journal Article
Short, T. L., & Riggs, K. J. (2016). Defending simulation theory against the argument from error. Mind & language, 31(2), 248-262. doi:10.1111/mila.12103

We defend the Simulation Theory of Mind against a challenge from the Theory Theory of Mind. The challenge is that while Simulation Theory can account for Theory of Mind errors, it cannot account for their systematic nature. There are Theory of Mind e... Read More

Parallels between action-object mapping and word-object mapping in young children (2015)
Journal Article
Riggs, K. J., Mather, E., Hyde, G., & Simpson, A. (2016). Parallels between action-object mapping and word-object mapping in young children. Cognitive science, 40(4), 992-1006. https://doi.org/10.1111/cogs.12262

© 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc. Across a series of four experiments with 3- to 4-year-olds we demonstrate how cognitive mechanisms supporting noun learning extend to the mapping of actions to objects. In Experiment 1 (n = 61) the demonstration... Read More

Developing thoughts about what might have been (2014)
Journal Article
Beck, S. R., & Riggs, K. (2014). Developing thoughts about what might have been. Child development perspectives, 8(3), 175-179. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12082

Recent research has changed how developmental psychologists understand counterfactual thinking or thoughts of what might have been. Evidence suggests that counterfactual thinking develops over an extended period into at least middle childhood, depend... Read More

Three- and 4-year-olds encode modeled actions in two ways leading to immediate imitation and delayed emulation (2011)
Journal Article
Simpson, A., & Riggs, K. J. (2011). Three- and 4-year-olds encode modeled actions in two ways leading to immediate imitation and delayed emulation. Developmental Psychology, 47(3), (834-840). doi:10.1037/a0023270. ISSN 0012-1649

When copying a model's behavior with a tool, children tend to imitate (copy the specific actions to replicate the model's goal) rather than emulate (bring about the model's goal in the most efficient way). Tasks producing these findings test children... Read More

Refining the understanding of inhibitory processes: how response prepotency is created and overcome (2011)
Journal Article
Simpson, A., Riggs, K., Beck, S. R., Gorniak, S. L., Wu, Y., Abbott, D., & Diamond, A. (2012). Refining the understanding of inhibitory processes: how response prepotency is created and overcome. Developmental Science, 15(1), 62-73. doi:10.1111/j.1467-7687.2011.01105.x

Understanding (a) how responses become prepotent provides insights into when inhibition is needed in everyday life. Understanding (b) how response prepotency is overcome provides insights for helping children develop strategies for overcoming such te... Read More

Under what conditions do children have difficulty in inhibiting imitation? Evidence for the importance of planning specific responses (2011)
Journal Article
Simpson, A., & Riggs, K. J. (2011). Under what conditions do children have difficulty in inhibiting imitation? Evidence for the importance of planning specific responses. Journal of experimental child psychology, 109(4), 512-524. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2011.02.015

The response set effect has been observed in a number of developmental tasks that are proposed to required inhibition. This effect has been interpreted as evidence that the specific responses children plan to make in these tasks become prepotent. Her... Read More

The development of visual short-term memory for multifeature items during middle childhood (2011)
Journal Article
Riggs, K. J., Simpson, A., & Potts, T. (2011). The development of visual short-term memory for multifeature items during middle childhood. Journal of experimental child psychology, 108(4), (802-809). doi:10.1016/j.jecp.2010.11.006. ISSN 0022-0965

Visual short-term memory (VSTM) research suggests that the adult capacity is limited to three or four multifeature object representations. Despite evidence supporting a developmental increase in capacity, it remains unclear what the unit of capacity... Read More

The effect of causal chain length on counterfactual conditional reasoning (2010)
Journal Article
Beck, S. R., Riggs, K. J., & Gorniak, S. L. (2010). The effect of causal chain length on counterfactual conditional reasoning. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 28(3), 505-521. doi:10.1348/026151009X450836

We investigated German and Nichols' finding that 3-year-olds could answer counterfactual conditional questions about short causal chains of events, but not long. In four experiments (N =192), we compared 3- and 4-year-olds' performance on short and l... Read More

Relating developments in children's counterfactual thinking and executive functions (2009)
Journal Article
Beck, S. R., Riggs, K. J., & Gorniak, S. L. (2009). Relating developments in children's counterfactual thinking and executive functions. Thinking and Reasoning, 15(4), (337-354). doi:10.1080/13546780903135904. ISSN 1354-6783

The performance of 93 children aged 3 and 4 years on a battery of different counterfactual tasks was assessed. Three measures: short causal chains, location change counterfactual conditionals, and false syllogisms—but not a fourth, long causal... Read More

What makes responses prepotent for young children? Insights from the grass-snow task (2008)
Journal Article
Simpson, A., & Riggs, K. J. (2009). What makes responses prepotent for young children? Insights from the grass-snow task. Infant and Child Development, 18(1), 21-35. doi:10.1002/icd.576

Understanding how responses become prepotent is essential for understanding when inhibitory control is needed in everyday behaviour. We investigated prepotency in the grass–snow task—in which a child points to a green card when the experi... Read More