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Colour preferences of UK garden birds at supplementary seed feeders (2017)
Journal Article
Rothery, L., Scott, G. W., & Morrell, L. J. (2017). Colour preferences of UK garden birds at supplementary seed feeders. PloS one, 12(2), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0172422

Supplementary feeding of garden birds generally has benefits for both bird populations and human wellbeing. Birds have excellent colour vision, and show preferences for food items of particular colours, but research into colour preferences associated... Read More

Turbidity influences individual and group level responses to predation in guppies, Poecilia reticulata (2015)
Journal Article
Kimbell, H. S., & Morrell, L. (2015). Turbidity influences individual and group level responses to predation in guppies, Poecilia reticulata. Animal behaviour, 103(May), 179-185. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.02.027

© 2015 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Increasing turbidity (either sedimentary or organic) from anthropogenic sources has significant negative impacts on aquatic fauna, both directly and indirectly by disrupting behaviour. In part... Read More

Consequences of variation in predator attack for the evolution of the selfish herd (2014)
Journal Article
Morrell, L. J., Greenwood, L., & Ruxton, G. D. (2015). Consequences of variation in predator attack for the evolution of the selfish herd. Evolutionary Ecology, 29(1), 107-121. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10682-014-9743-6

There is a strong body of evidence that patterns of collective behaviour in grouping animals are governed by interactions between small numbers of individuals within the group. These findings contrast with study of the ‘selfish herd’, where increasin... Read More

Costs of colour change in fish: food intake and behavioural decisions (2013)
Journal Article
Rodgers, G. M., Gladman, N. W., Corless, H. F., & Morrell, L. J. (2013). Costs of colour change in fish: food intake and behavioural decisions. The journal of experimental biology, 216(14), 2760-2767. doi:10.1242/jeb.080879

Many animals, particularly reptiles, amphibians, fish and cephalopods, have the ability to change their body colour, for functions including thermoregulation, signalling and predator avoidance. Many fish plastically darken their body colouration in r... Read More

Artificial enhancement of an extended phenotype signal increases investment in courtship by three-spined sticklebacks (2012)
Journal Article
Morrell, L. J., Hentley, W. T., Wickens, V. J., Wickens, J. B., & Rodgers, G. M. (2012). Artificial enhancement of an extended phenotype signal increases investment in courtship by three-spined sticklebacks. Animal behaviour, 84(1), (93-101). doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2012.04.013. ISSN 0003-3472

Interactions between the components of a multiple-signal sexual display can be complex, and previous work has shown that alteration of one component can lead to changed investment in either the altered or other display components. Extended phenotype... Read More

Measuring marginal predation in animal groups (2011)
Journal Article
Hirsch, B. T., & Morrell, L. (2011). Measuring marginal predation in animal groups. Behavioral ecology, 22(3), 648-656. doi:10.1093/beheco/arr026

Predation is a major pressure that shapes animal sociality, but predation risk is not homogenous within groups. Animals located on the group edge typically face an increased threat of predation, although different patterns have been reported. We crea... Read More

Spatial positioning in the selfish herd (2010)
Journal Article
Morrell, L. J., Ruxton, G. D., & James, R. (2011). Spatial positioning in the selfish herd. Behavioral ecology, 22(1), 16-22. doi:10.1093/beheco/arq157

The antipredator benefits of grouping are relatively well understood; however, predation risk often differs for individuals that occupy different positions within a group. The selfish herd hypothesis describes how individuals can reduce risk of preda... Read More

Colour change and assortment in the western rainbowfish (2010)
Journal Article
Rodgers, G. M., Kelley, J. L., & Morrell, L. J. (2010). Colour change and assortment in the western rainbowfish. Animal behaviour, 79(5), (1025-1030). doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2010.01.017. ISSN 0003-3472

Grouping behaviour is widespread across the animal kingdom, and is known to reduce an individual's risk of predation, for example through predator confusion. Theory predicts that individuals that are different in appearance to the rest of the group a... Read More

Plasticity in male courtship behaviour as a function of light intensity in guppies (2009)
Journal Article
Chapman, B. B., Morrell, L. J., & Krause, J. (2009). Plasticity in male courtship behaviour as a function of light intensity in guppies. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 63(12), (1757-1763). doi:10.1007/s00265-009-0796-4. ISSN 0340-5443

The environment is profoundly important in shaping many aspects of animal phenotype, including courtship and mating behaviours. Courtship displays rely upon the transmission of visual information from the signaller to the receiver, which means they a... Read More

Does defection during predator inspection affect social structure in wild shoals of guppies? (2008)
Journal Article
Thomas, P. O. R., Croft, D. P., Morrell, L., Davis, A., Faria, J. J., Dyer, J. R. G., …Krause, J. (2008). Does defection during predator inspection affect social structure in wild shoals of guppies?. Animal behaviour, 75(1), (43-53). doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2007.06.004. ISSN 0003-3472

Reciprocal altruism has been proposed as a possible mechanism for the evolution of cooperative behaviour. However, very few investigations have tested predictions of reciprocity in wild animal populations. In the current investigation we simulated de... Read More

Optimal individual positions within animal groups (2008)
Journal Article
Morrell, L., & Romey, W. L. (2008). Optimal individual positions within animal groups. Behavioral ecology, 19(4), 909-919. doi:10.1093/beheco/arn050

Animal groups are highly variable in their spatial structure, and individual fitness is strongly associated with the spatial position of an animal within a group. Predation risk and food gains are often higher at the group peripheries; thus, animals... Read More

A cost of leadership in human groups (2007)
Journal Article
Piyapong, C., Morrell, L. J., Croft, D. P., Dyer, J. R. G., Ioannou, C. C., & Krause, J. (2007). A cost of leadership in human groups. Ethology, 113(9), (821-824). doi:10.1111/j.1439-0310.2007.01382.x. ISSN 0179-1613

Group living is the result of a dynamic trade-off between associated costs and benefits. However, these costs and benefits are not necessarily distributed equally across different spatial positions of groups which may result in different fitness retu... Read More

Diet, familiarity and shoaling decisions in guppies (2007)
Journal Article
Morrell, L. J., Hunt, K. L., Croft, D. P., & Krause, J. (2007). Diet, familiarity and shoaling decisions in guppies. Animal behaviour, 74(2), (311-319). doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2006.10.021. ISSN 0003-3472

Animals are known to derive benefits from associating with familiar individuals, and familiarity is important in the structuring of animal groups. In fish, individuals are known to shoal preferentially with others they have previously spent time with... Read More

Fighting in fiddler crabs Uca mjoebergi: what determines duration? (2005)
Journal Article
Morrell, L. J., Backwell, P. R., & Metcalfe, N. B. (2005). Fighting in fiddler crabs Uca mjoebergi: what determines duration?. Animal behaviour, 70(3), (653-662). doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2004.11.014. ISSN 0003-3472

Contest duration in animals is often interpreted as being a consequence of mutual assessment of the difference in the competitors' resource-holding potential (RHP), allowing the inferior individual to avoid costly interactions it is likely to lose. D... Read More

Why are small males aggressive? (2005)
Journal Article
Morrell, L. J., Lindström, J., & Ruxton, G. D. (2005). Why are small males aggressive?. Proceedings. the Royal Society. Biological sciences /, 272(1569), 1235-1241. doi:10.1098/rspb.2005.3085

Aggression is ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, whenever the interests of individuals conflict. In contests between animals, the larger opponent is often victorious. However, counter intuitively, an individual that has little chance of winning (gener... Read More