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Get your facts right : preschoolers systematically extend both object names and category-relevant facts (2016)
Journal Article
Holland, A. K., Mather, E., Simpson, A., & Riggs, K. J. (2016). Get your facts right : preschoolers systematically extend both object names and category-relevant facts. Frontiers in Psychology, 7(JUL), https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01064

There is an ongoing debate over the extent to which language development shares common processing mechanisms with other domains of learning. It is well-established that toddlers will systematically extend object labels to similarly-shaped category ex... Read More about Get your facts right : preschoolers systematically extend both object names and category-relevant facts.

The effect of alcohol dependence on automatic visuo-spatial perspective taking (2016)
Journal Article
Riggs, K., Simpson, A., Chandler, C., & Cox, S. (2016). The effect of alcohol dependence on automatic visuo-spatial perspective taking. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 166, 21-25. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.06.007

Background: Alcoholism is associated with cognitive deficits which affect social functioning. Previous research has shown that alcoholism is associated with deficits in conscious, deliberate social processing. However, little is known about whether a... Read More about The effect of alcohol dependence on automatic visuo-spatial perspective taking.

Defending simulation theory against the argument from error (2016)
Journal Article
Short, T. L., & Riggs, K. J. (2016). Defending simulation theory against the argument from error. Mind & language, 31(2), 248-262. doi:10.1111/mila.12103

We defend the Simulation Theory of Mind against a challenge from the Theory Theory of Mind. The challenge is that while Simulation Theory can account for Theory of Mind errors, it cannot account for their systematic nature. There are Theory of Mind e... Read More about Defending simulation theory against the argument from error.

Young children's referent selection is guided by novelty for both words and actions (2016)
Journal Article
Dysart, E. L., Mather, E., & Riggs, K. J. (2016). Young children's referent selection is guided by novelty for both words and actions. Journal of experimental child psychology, 146, 231-237. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2016.01.003

Young children are biased to select novel, name-unknown objects as referents of novel labels (e.g., Markman, 1990) and similarly favour novel, action-unknown objects as referents of novel actions (Riggs, Mather, Hyde & Simpson, 2015). What process un... Read More about Young children's referent selection is guided by novelty for both words and actions.