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Native American Indian freemasonry (2020)
Book Chapter
Porter, J. (2020). Native American Indian freemasonry. In F. Jacob, & H. Reinalter (Eds.), Masonic lodges and their impact in North and South America (71-89). Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann

Treatied spaces: North American indigenous treaties in global context (2019)
Book Chapter
Porter, J. (in press). Treatied spaces: North American indigenous treaties in global context. In A. McGrath, & L. Russell (Eds.), The Routledge Companion to Global Indigenous History. (1). Routledge

In 1928, the librarian and scholar Lawrence C. Wroth wrote of how he wished he had been poured “the strong wine” of Indian Treaties as a student instead of the “invincible mediocrity” of the duller literature on the colonial period. This chapter shou... Read More about Treatied spaces: North American indigenous treaties in global context.

The horror genre and aspects of Native American Indian literature (2018)
Book Chapter
Porter, J. (2018). The horror genre and aspects of Native American Indian literature. In K. Corstorphine, & L. Kremmel (Eds.), The Palgrave Handbook to Horror Literature (45-60). London: Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-97406-4_4

Porter offers a fascinating exploration of the limitations of genre in relation to certain horror literature produced by authors who identify as American Indian. She explores the horror genre as a context within which the Native dispossession foundat... Read More about The horror genre and aspects of Native American Indian literature.

Progressivism and Native American Self-Expression in the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth century (2014)
Book Chapter
Porter, J. (2014). Progressivism and Native American Self-Expression in the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth century. In G. D. Smithers, & B. N. Newman (Eds.), Native Diasporas: Indigenous Identities and Setller Colonialism in North America (273-296). Lincoln, Nebraska: The University of Nebraska Press

This book chapter opens a broad and rewarding analytical window into late nineteenth and early twentieth century identity struggles by introducing the idea of equalling Native American Indian persistence with Native American Indian resistence.