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Treatied spaces: North American indigenous treaties in global context (2019)
Book Chapter
Porter, J. (in press). Treatied spaces: North American indigenous treaties in global context. In Companion to Indigenous Global HistoryTaylor & Francis (Routledge)

In 1928, the librarian and scholar Lawrence C. Wroth wrote of how he wished he had been poured “the strong wine” of Indian Treaties as a student instead of the “invincible mediocrity” of the duller literature on the colonial period. This chapter shou... Read More

Language intermediaries and local agency: peacebuilding, translation/interpreting and political disempowerment in 'mature' post-Dayton Bosnia-Herzegovina (2019)
Journal Article
Baker, C. (in press). Language intermediaries and local agency: peacebuilding, translation/interpreting and political disempowerment in 'mature' post-Dayton Bosnia-Herzegovina. Journal of War and Culture Studies, https://doi.org/10.1080/17526272.2019.1644413

The peace negotiations that ended the 1992–95 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina established a constitutional system of ethnic power-sharing that satisfied its signatories (the presidents of Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia) enough for war to cease and provided for... Read More

What happened to the Second World? Earthquakes and postsocialism in Kazakhstan (2019)
Journal Article
Bankoff, G., & Oven, K. (in press). What happened to the Second World? Earthquakes and postsocialism in Kazakhstan. Disasters, 44, 2020(1), https://doi.org/10.1111/disa.12362

There is an assumption that with the disintegration of the USSR the Second World ceased to exist. Yet the demise of the Communist bloc as a geopolitical reality did not mean that it ceased to exert a defining influence over how people think and behav... Read More

A century of Armistice Day: memorialisation in the wake of the First World War (2019)
Journal Article
Macleod, J., & Inall, Y. (in press). A century of Armistice Day: memorialisation in the wake of the First World War. Mortality, https://doi.org/10.1080/13576275.2019.1611752

In the wake of the First World War a set of commemorative traditions were invented that were met with a huge public response and were repeated in almost every subsequent November. These apparently unchanging traditions were reported in the media each... Read More

Arras 200: revisiting Britain's most famous Iron Age cemetery (2019)
Journal Article
Halkon, P., Lyall, J., Deverell, J., Hunt, T., & Fernández-Götz, M. (2019). Arras 200: revisiting Britain's most famous Iron Age cemetery. Antiquity, 93(368), https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2019.28

In the bicentenary year of its excavation, remote sensing has revealed, for the first time, the full extent of this iconic type-site Iron Age cemetery and its landscape context in East Yorkshire. A total of 23ha was surveyed, revealing new insights c... Read More

What female pop-folk celebrity in south-east Europe tells postsocialist feminist media studies about global formations of race (2019)
Journal Article
Baker, C. (in press). What female pop-folk celebrity in south-east Europe tells postsocialist feminist media studies about global formations of race. Feminist Media Studies, 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1080/14680777.2019.1599035

Feminist media studies of postsocialism are well practised at explaining how ideologies of gender and nation reinforce each other amid neoliberal capitalism on Europe’s semi-periphery. They extend this, by critiquing media marginalization of Roma, in... Read More

Under the volcano: Mount Mayon and co-volcanic societies in the Philippines (2019)
Journal Article
Bankoff, G. (in press). Under the volcano: Mount Mayon and co-volcanic societies in the Philippines. Environment and History, 2020,

Rich volcanic soils have long attracted human settlements which have traded the risk of eruption against the benefits of higher agricultural yields. Yet little research has been done on how societies have normalized the risks and adapted to living in... Read More

Maternity and justice in the Early Modern English Court of Chancery (2019)
Journal Article
Capern, A. (in press). Maternity and justice in the Early Modern English Court of Chancery. Journal of British Studies, 58(4),

This article is a case study of female litigants acting in the capacity of mother in the English equity court of Chancery between 1550 and 1700. It starts by asking how prevalent mothers were as plaintiffs and defendants in Chancery, though the burde... Read More

Textual representation, class exploitation and the postcolonial: is the proletariat always in twilight? (2019)
Journal Article
Baker, C. (2019). Textual representation, class exploitation and the postcolonial: is the proletariat always in twilight?. New perspectives : interdisciplinary journal of Central & East European politics and international relations, 27(1), 3-8

Commentary on Rade Zinaic, 'Twilight of the Proletariat: Reading Critical Balkanology as Liberal Ideology' (New Perspectives: Interdisciplinary Journal of Central and East European Politics 25:1 (2017), 19-54)

More than Bricks and Mortar: female property ownership as economic strategy in Mid-Nineteenth Century urban England (2019)
Journal Article
Aston, J., Capern, A., & McDonagh, B. (in press). More than Bricks and Mortar: female property ownership as economic strategy in Mid-Nineteenth Century urban England. Urban history, https://doi.org/10.1017/S0963926819000142

This paper uses a quantitative and qualitative methodology to examine the role that women played as property owners in three mid nineteenth-century English towns. Using data from the previously under-utilized rate books, we argue that women were acti... Read More

Interviewing for research on languages and war (2019)
Book Chapter
Baker, C. (2019). Interviewing for research on languages and war. In M. Kelly, H. Footitt, & M. Salama-Carr (Eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Languages and Conflict, 157-179. Palgrave Macmillan. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-04825-9_8

Many participants in conflict have experienced it through mediations of meaning between languages, and whole categories of participants have even often gone unnoticed in the study of war because of the historic ‘invisibility’ of languages and transla... Read More

First aid and voluntarism in England, 1945-­85 (2019)
Journal Article
Ramsden, S., & Wall, R. (2019). First aid and voluntarism in England, 1945-­85. Twentieth Century British History, https://doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy043

First aid was the focus of growing voluntary activity in the post-war decades. Despite the advent of the National Health Service in 1948, increased numbers of people volunteered to learn, teach, and administer first aid as concern about health and sa... Read More

Khadduri as gatekeeper of the Islamic Law of Nations? (2018)
Book Chapter
Allain, J. (2018). Khadduri as gatekeeper of the Islamic Law of Nations?. In International law and Islam: historical explorations, 127-145. Brill Academic Publishers. https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004388376_008

This chapter demonstrates the discrepancy between Majid Khadduri’s representation of Muhammad Shaybani and the Siyar – the Islamic Law of Nations – in his 1966 The Islamic Law of Nations, and that found in Mahmood Ahmad Ghazi’s 1998 translation of Sh... Read More

The horror genre and aspects of Native American Indian literature (2018)
Book Chapter
Porter, J. (2018). The horror genre and aspects of Native American Indian literature. In K. Corstorphine, & L. Kremmel (Eds.), The Palgrave Handbook to Horror Literature, 45-60. Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-97406-4_4

Porter offers a fascinating exploration of the limitations of genre in relation to certain horror literature produced by authors who identify as American Indian. She explores the horror genre as a context within which the Native dispossession foundat... Read More

Unsung heroism?: showbusiness and social action in Britain’s military wives choir(s) (2018)
Book Chapter
Baker, C. (2018). Unsung heroism?: showbusiness and social action in Britain’s military wives choir(s). In V. Kitchen, & J. G. Mathers (Eds.), Heroism and Global Politics, 122-146. Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

In 2011, the BBC documentary The Choir visited military bases in Devon to film with wives and partners of British servicemen who had been deployed to Afghanistan. Amid a growing convergence between popular entertainment, popular militarism, and ‘Reme... Read More

Remaking the world in our own image: vulnerability, resilience and adaptation as historical discourses (2018)
Journal Article
Bankoff, G. (2018). Remaking the world in our own image: vulnerability, resilience and adaptation as historical discourses. Disasters, 43(2), 221-239. https://doi.org/10.1111/disa.12312

A warming climate and less predictable weather patterns, as well as an expanding urban infrastructure susceptible to geophysical hazards, make the world an increasingly dangerous place, even for those living in high‐income countries. It is an opportu... Read More