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Beyond the abolition of dual administration: The challenges to NGO governance in 21st century China

Yang, Yongjiao; Wilkinson, Mick; Zhang, Xiongxiong

Authors

Yongjiao Yang

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Dr Mick Wilkinson M.D.Wilkinson@hull.ac.uk
Lecturer in Modern Slavery, Criminology & Social Justice

Xiongxiong Zhang



Abstract

The abolition of dual administration of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in China is an inexorable and essential trend toward a genuine civil society. This article seeks to examine the challenges that come with the abolition of the dual administration and to explore how to address them during this transitional period. It considers the state dominated NGO governance in China and its transformation since the 1990s and argues that the decisive role the government plays in NGOs’ development, which is criticized by many scholars, is the outcome of Chinese history, political culture and the needs of NGOs. It gives account of the challenges for NGO governance and development following the abolition of dual administration. Suggestions for new approaches to NGO development are discussed from the perspectives of a value-based partnership between NGOs and the government, the importance of securing public trust, the development of legal systems and finally, the role of NGO network organizations.

Citation

Yang, Y., Wilkinson, M., & Zhang, X. (2016). Beyond the abolition of dual administration: The challenges to NGO governance in 21st century China. Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, 27(5), 2292-2310. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11266-014-9521-7

Journal Article Type Article
Online Publication Date Oct 2, 2014
Publication Date 2016-10
Deposit Date Jun 11, 2019
Publicly Available Date
Journal VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations
Print ISSN 0957-8765
Electronic ISSN 1573-7888
Publisher Springer Verlag
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 27
Issue 5
Pages 2292-2310
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s11266-014-9521-7
Keywords Strategy and Management; Business and International Management; Sociology and Political Science; Public Administration
Public URL https://hull-repository.worktribe.com/output/1970037
Publisher URL https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11266-014-9521-7