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Who’s zooming (out on) who?: Reconceptualising family and domestic spaces in childhood studies

Seymour, Julie

Authors

Julie Seymour



Contributors

Sam Frankel
Editor

Sally McNamee
Editor

Abstract

It could be argued that the sign of ‘maturity’ of an academic paradigm is when it moves to some kind of integration with existing theories or re-engages with elements which may initially have been perceived as ‘dangerous’ or antithetical to the original demarcation of the area. As with the re-integration of feminism and reproduction, and disability and embodiment, so perhaps also for the social study of childhood and family research. The necessary political emphasis on the agency and voice of the child in the emerging social study of childhood research may well have been overstating the case (Seymour and McNamee, 2012) and ignoring significant structural and generational impediments in children’s relationships and interactions particularly in domestic spaces. To redress this, as occurred with feminist and disability studies, a contemporary standpoint is required which merges an emancipatory agentic approach to the subject of study with conceptual developments from the previously separated substantive area. This article will outline the development of the return of children ‘back into the families’ which has occurred in the last decade. It will show how approaches using family practices, personal lives, family display and generagency can be combined with privileging children’s perspectives and voices at home.

Publisher Emerald
Series Title Sociological Studies of Children and Youth
Book Title Bringing children back into the family: relationality and connectedness
APA6 Citation Seymour, J. (in press). Who’s zooming (out on) who?: Reconceptualising family and domestic spaces in childhood studies. In Bringing children back into the family: relationality and connectednessEmerald

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