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The influence of self-compassion on perceived responsibility and shame following acquired brain injury

Ambridge, Jade; Fleming, Peter; Henshall, Lauren

Authors

Jade Ambridge

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Dr Peter Fleming P.Fleming@hull.ac.uk
Clinical Tutor and Consultant Clinical Neuropsychologist

Lauren Henshall



Abstract

Primary objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of perceived personal responsibility for an acquired ABI (ABI) on shame, and whether self-compassion moderates this relationship. We hypothesized that people who perceived themselves to be responsible for their injury would have high levels of shame and poorer recovery outcomes.
Research design: A mixed-methods design was employed using both standardized measures and a series of open questions.
Methods and procedures: 66 participants with ABI were included in the analysis. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlations, multiple regression, and thematic analysis.
Main outcomes and results: Significant relationships were found between self-compassion, shame, anxiety, and depression, but perceived responsibility for ABI was not correlated with any examined variables. Due to issues with the measurement of responsibility, it was not possible to complete all proposed forms of analysis. The thematic analysis revealed the ways participants’ injuries affected their perceived level of functioning, its consequences for sense of self, shame, and self-compassion.
Conclusions: This study concluded that people with ABI might experience shame with respect to the injury’s impact on functioning. Study limitations and implications for providing therapeutic interventions such as Compassion Focused Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy are discussed.

Journal Article Type Article
Journal Brain Injury
Print ISSN 0269-9052
Electronic ISSN 1362-301X
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 34
Issue 7
Pages 945-957
APA6 Citation Ambridge, J., Fleming, P., & Henshall, L. (in press). The influence of self-compassion on perceived responsibility and shame following acquired brain injury. Brain Injury, 34(7), 945-957. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699052.2020.1763466
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/02699052.2020.1763466
Keywords Acquired ABI; Third-wave; Self-compassion; Responsibility; Shame
Publisher URL https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02699052.2020.1763466?journalCode=ibij20

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This file is under embargo until Jun 6, 2021 due to copyright reasons.

Contact P.Fleming@hull.ac.uk to request a copy for personal use.




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