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Impact of habitat fragmentation on genetic population structure of roach, Rutilus rutilus, in a riparian ecosystem

Hänfling, Bernd; Durka, W.; Brandl, R.

Authors

Dr Bernd Haenfling B.Haenfling@hull.ac.uk
Senior Lecturer/ Chair of the Evolutionary Biology Group (EvoHull)

W. Durka

R. Brandl



Abstract

During the last 200 years, the riparian ecosystem along major rivers has been reduced to a few scattered remnants. Important elements of the riparian ecosystem are water bodies which were originally connected to the main river channel by annual floodings. Due to river regulations many of these remnants are now virtually isolated. In an allozyme analysis using roach, Rutilus rutilus, as a study species we demonstrate that the genetic diversity (number of alleles per locus, expected heterozygosity) of populations living within floodplain water bodies is not severely impoverished compared to the genetic diversity within the main river channel. However, we found slight differences in the allele frequencies of flood plain water bodies and the main river channel. Nevertheless, fish populations in floodplain water bodies may serve as reservoirs of autochthonous genetic material for restoration of fish populations in the main river channel after population extinction due to catastrophic accidents (e.g. industrial pollution).

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date 2004-03
Journal CONSERVATION GENETICS
Print ISSN 1566-0621
Publisher Springer Verlag
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 5
Issue 2
Pages 247-257
APA6 Citation Hänfling, B., Durka, W., & Brandl, R. (2004). Impact of habitat fragmentation on genetic population structure of roach, Rutilus rutilus, in a riparian ecosystem. Conservation genetics, 5(2), 247-257. https://doi.org/10.1023...OGE.0000030008.20492.2c
DOI https://doi.org/10.1023/B%3ACOGE.0000030008.20492.2c
Keywords Allele loss; Allozyme; Conservation genetics; F-statistics; Floodplains
Publisher URL https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FB%3ACOGE.0000030008.20492.2c