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To what extent are the Christian clergy acting as frontline mental health workers? A study from the North of England

Wood, Emily; Watson, Roger; Hayter, Mark

Authors

Emily Wood



Abstract

The Church has always been associated with care of the sick; this continues today many clergy see people with mental health issues. Studies outside the United Kingdom have shown that when people with mental health issues visit clergy for help they often do this before, or instead of, seeing health professionals. This study surveyed Christian clergy and asked about the frequency with which clergy saw people with mental health problems, if they referred onto healthcare professionals, what outcomes they expected and their attitudes to mental health. It was concluded that the clergy did see people with mental health problems but the frequency varied amongst individuals and this was not dependent on denomination. These findings agreed with other studies that a very high percentage of British clergy do refer on, unlike North American clergy and this was not related to denomination.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date 2011-10
Journal Mental Health, Religion and Culture
Print ISSN 1367-4676
Electronic ISSN 1469-9737
Publisher Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 14
Issue 8
Pages 769-783
APA6 Citation Wood, E., Watson, R., & Hayter, M. (2011). To what extent are the Christian clergy acting as frontline mental health workers? A study from the North of England. Mental Health, Religion and Culture, 14(8), 769-783. https://doi.org/10.1080/13674676.2010.522565
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/13674676.2010.522565
Keywords Christian clergy: England; Gate keeping; Frontline; Help seeking; Religion
Publisher URL https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13674676.2010.522565
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