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The economic benefits of increasing kangaroo skin-to-skin care and breastfeeding in neonatal units: Analysis of a pragmatic intervention in clinical practice

Lowson, Karin; Offer, Clare; Watson, Julie; McGuire, Bill; Renfrew, Mary J

Authors

Karin Lowson

Clare Offer

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Ms Julie Watson J.Watson2@hull.ac.uk
Lecturer / Research active / and Programme Director -Midwifery 85 week Programme

Bill McGuire

Mary J Renfrew



Abstract

© Lowson et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: A number of significant recent research studies have used techniques of economic modelling to demonstrate the potential benefits of increasing breastfeeding rates in the UK overall, and specifically in neonatal care. This paper complements this growing body of evidence by presenting an economic analysis of data from an actual intervention, the 'Getting It Right From the Start' programme, which took place in the north of the UK during 2011-12, with the aim of increasing breastfeeding and kangaroo skin-to-skin care rates in neonatal units. Methods: 'Getting It Right from the Start' was a pragmatic, multifaceted programme of change delivered under the auspices of the regional Health Innovation and Education Cluster, of which 17 were established in the UK in 2010. It engaged with 18 neonatal units in two Neonatal Networks with the aim of increasing kangaroo skin-to-skin care and breastfeeding rates. Results: Overall, the economic analysis demonstrated that for every £1 invested in the intervention to increase kangaroo skin-to-skin care and breastfeeding rates, between £4.00 and £13.82 of benefit was generated. This was spread across different healthcare settings and the timescale for the realisation of benefits will vary. Conclusion: This was one of the first economic evaluations of an actual intervention to increase breastfeeding and kangaroo skin-to-skin care in neonatal units. It complements the existing economic models by demonstrating that a real intervention in clinical practice was both cost effective as well as clinically beneficial. Future interventions with similar methodology should be supported and considered likely to generate significant cost savings compared to outlay.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date 2015-12
Journal International Breastfeeding Journal
Electronic ISSN 1746-4358
Publisher Springer Verlag
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 10
Issue 1
Article Number 11
APA6 Citation Lowson, K., Offer, C., Watson, J., McGuire, B., & Renfrew, M. J. (2015). The economic benefits of increasing kangaroo skin-to-skin care and breastfeeding in neonatal units: Analysis of a pragmatic intervention in clinical practice. International Breastfeeding Journal, 10(1), doi:10.1186/s13006-015-0035-8
DOI https://doi.org/10.1186/s13006-015-0035-8
Keywords Quality improvement; Change at scale; Breastfeeding; Kangaroo care; Skin-to-skin; Kangaroo skin-to-skin; Costs; Benefits; Economics; Neonatal; Preterm
Publisher URL https://internationalbreastfeedingjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13006-015-0035-8
Related Public URLs https://www.researchgate.net/publication/276925695
Copyright Statement © Lowson et al.; licensee BioMed Central. 2015

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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Copyright Statement
© Lowson et al.; licensee BioMed Central. 2015

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.







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