Skip to main content

Self-reported health status of older adults in Malaysia and Singapore: evidence from the 2007 Global Ageing Survey

Khan, Hafiz T. A.; Flynn, Matt

Authors

Hafiz T. A. Khan

Matt Flynn



Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate the correlates of self-reported health (SRH) among older adults in Malaysia and Singapore. The study uses data collected in the Global Ageing Study (GLAS) 2007, one of the largest surveys of its kind, specially designed to investigate attitudes towards later life, ageing and retirement. Data were collected from 1002 and 1004 respondents from Malaysia and Singapore respectively. The study found that Singaporeans report a healthier life than Malaysians. The two countries have consistent results with regard to the influences of selected covariates on individual health. Poorer health is more prevalent among people with lower education, among those widowed, divorced or separated, and those working in blue-collar occupations. Although social support is found to be an important determinant of SRH, the effects are partially confounded with other covariates. These findings enhance our knowledge about the health status of older people, and in turn will be useful for governments to ensure effective policy making.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date 2016-09
Journal Applied Research in Quality of Life
Print ISSN 1871-2584
Electronic ISSN 1871-2576
Publisher Springer (part of Springer Nature)
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 11
Issue 3
Pages 687-705
APA6 Citation Khan, H. T. A., & Flynn, M. (2016). Self-reported health status of older adults in Malaysia and Singapore: evidence from the 2007 Global Ageing Survey. Applied Research in Quality of Life, 11(3), 687-705. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11482-015-9390-2
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s11482-015-9390-2
Keywords Self-reported health (SRH); Singapore and Malaysia; Cross-national comparison; Social support
Publisher URL https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11482-015-9390-2
Related Public URLs https://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/3423/
;