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A critical analysis of the theoretical construction and empirical measurement of cognitive load

Martin, Stewart

Authors



Contributors

Robert Z. Zheng
Editor

Abstract

The application of cognitive load theory has been at the forefront of work in cognition and learning for some time. Cognitive load theory seeks to explain how and why some material is more difficult to learn and is based on the proposition that the human brain uses two types of memory: short-term (working) and long-term (storage) memory. Cognitive load measurements are relative, transient, and subject to a significant number of empirical and time-sensitive factors. Measures of cognitive load should therefore be treated with caution and differentiation between germane, extraneous, and intrinsic load remains challenging for all instruments. Overall mental performance is a multidimensional construct, and cognitive load theory does not take account of factors such as the influence of individual goals, or beliefs on cognitive performance. It has been proposed that cognitive load theory implies that the physical integration of multiple sources of information is generally beneficial for learners, as happens when, for example, text and images are combined.

Publication Date Nov 22, 2017
Journal Cognitive Load Measurement and Application
Publisher Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Pages 29-44
Book Title Cognitive load measurement and application: A theoretical framework for meaningful research and practice
ISBN 9781315296258
APA6 Citation Martin, S. (2017). A critical analysis of the theoretical construction and empirical measurement of cognitive load. In R. Z. Zheng (Ed.), Cognitive load measurement and application: A theoretical framework for meaningful research and practice, 29-44. Taylor & Francis (Routledge). https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315296258-3
DOI https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315296258-3
Publisher URL https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9781315296258/chapters/10.4324/9781315296258-3
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