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Global warming and mass extinctions associated with large igneous province volcanism

Bond, David; Sun, Yadong

Authors

Yadong Sun

Abstract

The coincidence of large igneous province (LIP) eruptions with at least three, if not all of the “Big Five” biotic crises of the Phanerozoic implies that volcanism is a key driver of mass extinctions. Many LIP-induced extinction scenarios invoke global warming, caused primarily (but not exclusively) by greenhouse gases emitted at the site of LIP emplacement and by contact metamorphism of carbon-rich host rocks. Here we explore a) the climate-changing products of volcanism including sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from eruptions, contact metamorphism, and melting (dissociation) of gas hydrates; b) their deadly effects, including marine anoxia and thermal stress; c) increasingly sophisticated paleotemperature proxies (e.g. δ18O of shell material) through case studies of the best-known LIP-warming-extinction nexi; and d) global warming through the lens of the putative “Anthropocene” extinction.

Publisher American Geophysical Union
Book Title Environmental Change and Large Igneous Provinces: The Deadly Kiss of LIPs
ISBN 978-1-119-50745-1
Institution Citation Bond, D., & Sun, Y. (in press). Global warming and mass extinctions associated with large igneous province volcanism. In Environmental Change and Large Igneous Provinces: The Deadly Kiss of LIPsAmerican Geophysical Union