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Object imagery and object identification: Object imagers are better at identifying spatially-filtered visual objects

Vannucci, Manila; Mazzoni, Giuliana; Chiorri, Carlo; Cioli, Lavinia

Authors

Manila Vannucci

Carlo Chiorri

Lavinia Cioli

Abstract

Object imagery refers to the ability to construct pictorial images of objects. Individuals with high object imagery (high-OI) produce more vivid mental images than individuals with low object imagery (low-OI), and they encode and process both mental images and visual stimuli in a more global and holistic way. In the present study, we investigated whether and how level of object imagery may affect the way in which individuals identify visual objects. High-OI and low-OI participants were asked to perform a visual identification task with spatially-filtered pictures of real objects. Each picture was presented at nine levels of filtering, starting from the most blurred (level 1: only low spatial frequencies-global configuration) and gradually adding high spatial frequencies up to the complete version (level 9: global configuration plus local and internal details). Our data showed that high-OI participants identified stimuli at a lower level of filtering than participants with low-OI, indicating that they were better able than low-OI participants to identify visual objects at lower spatial frequencies. Implications of the results and future developments are discussed.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date May 31, 2008
Journal COGNITIVE PROCESSING
Print ISSN 1612-4782
Electronic ISSN 1612-4790
Publisher Springer Verlag
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 9
Issue 2
Pages 137-143
Institution Citation Vannucci, M., Mazzoni, G., Chiorri, C., & Cioli, L. (2008). Object imagery and object identification: Object imagers are better at identifying spatially-filtered visual objects. Cognitive processing, 9(2), 137-143. doi:10.1007/s10339-008-0203-5
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s10339-008-0203-5
Keywords Experimental and Cognitive Psychology; Cognitive Neuroscience; Artificial Intelligence; General Medicine
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