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Employment experiences of older nurses and midwives in the NHS

Wray, Jane; Aspland, Jo; Gibson, Helen; Stimpson, Anne; Watson, Roger

Authors

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Dr Jane Wray J.Wray@hull.ac.uk
Director of Research, Senior Lecturer in Nursing

Anne Stimpson



Abstract

AIM: To examine the employment experiences of older nurses and midwives working in the NHS. METHOD: A total of 27 semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with nurses and midwives to identify positive and negative aspects of their working lives in the NHS. The interviewees were selected from a potential pool of 87 nurses and midwives who had consented to be involved in an earlier part of the study. Data were analysed using QSR NVivo 7.0. FINDINGS: Positive and negative issues were identified as having an impact on the quality of working life. These included: access to training, change and Agenda for Change (AfC), quality of management, work demands, patient/colleague contact and nursing and midwifery as a career. CONCLUSION: This study highlighted a number of issues relevant to older nurses and midwives that warrant further study and attention. These include access to training and continuing professional development, issues relating to change and AfC, and general work demands including workload, resources and morale. The ability of staff to remain healthy, committed and able to deliver quality care can be compromised in cases where the staff experience is negative.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Nov 7, 2007
Journal Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987)
Print ISSN 0029-6570
Electronic ISSN 2047-9018
Publisher RCN Publishing
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 22
Issue 9
Pages 35-40
APA6 Citation Wray, J., Aspland, J., Gibson, H., Stimpson, A., & Watson, R. (2007). Employment experiences of older nurses and midwives in the NHS. Nursing standard : official newspaper of the Royal College of Nursing, 22(9), 35-40. https://doi.org/10.7748/ns2007.11.22.9.35.c6232
DOI https://doi.org/10.7748/ns2007.11.22.9.35.c6232
Keywords General Medicine
PMID 18038841
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