Skip to main content

Research Repository

See what's under the surface

Legislatures and the courts: the importance of place

Norton, Philip

Authors



Abstract

Institutions of the state are studied primarily in terms of behaviour, powers and outputs. Little attention has been paid to their location and how this affects relationships between them. This article examines the effects of location through a study of the highest domestic court in the United Kingdom moving from the Palace of Westminster to a separate building across the road from the Parliament. It examines the perceived benefits of the court and Parliament sharing the same space and the consequences of separation. The move from within the Palace of Westminster has effected a shift in judicial-legislative relations from one of respective autonomy to one of democratic dialogue.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date 2017-12
Journal Journal of international and comparative law
Print ISSN 2313-3775
Publisher Sweet and Maxwell
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 4
Issue 2
Pages 171-188
Institution Citation Norton, P. (2017). Legislatures and the courts: the importance of place. Journal of international and comparative law, 4(2), 171-188
Keywords Legislatures; Courts; Great Britain. Supreme Court; Great Britain. Parliament; Models of legislative-judicial relations; Dicey, A. V. (Albert Venn), 1835-1922
Additional Information This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Journal of international and comparative law following peer review. The definitive published version Norton, P. (2017). Legislatures and the courts: the importance of place. Journal of international and comparative law, 4(2), 171-188 is available online on Westlaw UK or from Thomson Reuters DocDel service .

Files







You might also like



Downloadable Citations