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Professor Mahbub Zaman

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Mahbub Zaman

Professsor of Accounting

Biography Professor Mahbub Zaman (BA Hons LSB, MA Essex, PhD Manchester) is Professor of Accounting and Research Director (Lead) at Hull University, UK. He has internationally recognised expertise, acquired over nearly two decades of research and teaching, in Auditing and Corporate Governance. His experience includes:

Professor of Auditing and Corporate Governance; Head of Research, School of Accountancy; Leader of the Auditing & Financial Reporting Group - at QUT Business School, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.

Associate professor and Director of the PhD (A&F) Programme, at Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, UK and appointments at University of Glasgow, University of Exeter and Aberystwyth University.

Visiting Professor at: Aarhus University (Denmark); Deakin University Melbourne (Australia) and University of Florida (USA).

External Examiner (BSc and MSc programmes): Birmingham, Bradford, Durham, Glasgow, Hull, and Nottingham universities.

Focusing on the intersection of auditing, reporting and governance and using mixed methods (archival, survey and qualitative) and multiple (agency, institutional and power) theoretical perspectives he brings novel insights to the literature and contributes to understanding of issues relevant to policy and practice. His key contributions and on-going research relate to audit committee and board effectiveness, audit quality, auditor reporting, standard setting and regulation, governance and sustainability.

Research Leadership:

Published in internationally leading journals with over 2,500 Google Scholar citations, including over 1,300 for his five papers on audit committees, sustainability and governance.
Expertise and interests include: audit committees, audit quality, auditor reporting, board effectiveness, sustainability, internal audit, risk management, standard setting and regulation.

Research funding from Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA), Chartered Accountants of Australia and New Zealand (CAANZ), Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW) and QUT High Potential Research Grant (HPRG).

Supervised over 10 PhD and numerous Masters students; examined over 15 PhD students.
Scopus Author ID 7102724116