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Dr Lesley Morrell

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Lesley Morrell

Associate Dean (Education)

Research Interests

My research investigates how animals perceive and respond to their environments, particularly in the context of social behaviour and environmental change. My group studies how animals interact with one another and their environment, and how the environment affects their behaviour. I am also interested in how students learn, and in evaluating the effectiveness of learning and teaching strategies.

Current research themes include:
Predator-prey interactions and the evolution of animal aggregation in response to predators, conspecifics and the distribution of resources.

The influence of experience and environmental change on behaviour, particularly in relation to the effects of increasing water turbidity on the behaviour of fishes.

The evolution of parental care, particularly the relationship between laterality (side biases in behaviour) and parental care in fish.

The effectiveness and value of feedback in student learning, the development of student autonomy, and the value of, and barriers to participation in fieldwork.

Biography I am a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Biological and Marine Sciences, and Associate Dean (Education) in the Faculty of Science and Engineering. My disciplinary research is in behaviour ecology, especially how animals perceive and respond to their environments, why they live in groups, and how they respond to predators. In my teaching, I am passionate about supporting students in their development into scientists, and in the acquisition of skills and competencies that support critical and independent thinking.
Teaching and Learning I am currently Associate Dean (Education) in the Faculty of Science and Engineering, and was previously Director of Studies for the Department of Biological and Marine Sciences.

My current teaching includes contributions to the following modules:
Professional & Research Skills for Biologists
Extinction
Behavioural Ecology
Structured Research Project (IUCN Red Listing)
Independent Research Project