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Left amygdala and putamen activation modulate emotion driven decisions in the iterated Prisoner’s Dilemma game

Eimontaite, Iveta; Schindler, Igor; De Marco, Matteo; Duzzi, Davide; Venneri, Annalena; Goel, Vinod

Authors

Iveta Eimontaite

Matteo De Marco

Davide Duzzi

Annalena Venneri

Vinod Goel



Abstract

Although economic decision-making is commonly characterized as a purely rational phenomenon, it is clear that real-world decision-making is influenced by emotions. Yet, relatively little is known about the neural correlates of this process. To explore this issue, 20 participants underwent fMRI scanning while engaged in the Prisoner’s Dilemma game under partner-directed sympathy, anger and neutral emotion conditions. Participants were most and least likely to cooperate after sympathy and anger induction, respectively, with the neutral condition eliciting intermediate cooperation rates. Moreover, the sympathy condition elicited quicker responses for cooperation than defection choices, whereas this pattern was reversed in the anger and neutral conditions. Left amygdala activation showed a positive correlation with cooperation rates and self-reports of partner directed sympathy in the sympathy condition. In the anger condition, left putamen activation was positively correlated with cooperation rates and negatively correlated with self-reports of partner directed anger strength. These findings indicate that while the left amygdala activation may be indicative of emotion enhancement and increase of cooperative behavior, the left putamen may help to suppress an emotion to overcome anger and engage in cooperation.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Jul 17, 2019
Journal Frontiers in Neuroscience
Print ISSN 1662-4548
Electronic ISSN 1662-453x
Publisher Frontiers Media
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 13
Article Number 741
APA6 Citation Eimontaite, I., Schindler, I., De Marco, M., Duzzi, D., Venneri, A., & Goel, V. (2019). Left amygdala and putamen activation modulate emotion driven decisions in the iterated Prisoner’s Dilemma game. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 13, https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2019.00741
DOI https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2019.00741
Keywords Prisoner’s dilemma; Sympathy; Anger; Amygdala; Putamen; Cooperation; Decision-making
Publisher URL https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnins.2019.00741/full
Additional Information Copyright © 2019 Eimontaite, Schindler, De Marco, Duzzi, Venneri and Goel. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

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Copyright Statement
Copyright © 2019 Eimontaite, Schindler, De Marco, Duzzi, Venneri and Goel. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.





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