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Manipulating cues in involuntary autobiographical memory: verbal cues are more effective than pictorial cues

Mazzoni, Giuliana; Vannucci, Manila; Batool, Iram

Authors

Manila Vannucci

Iram Batool

Abstract

In two experiments, pictorial cues were compared with their verbal labels to assess their effectiveness in eliciting involuntary autobiographical memories. Cues were relatively complex in Experiment 1 (e.g., relaxing on a beach) and simple objects in Experiment 2 (e.g., a ball). In both experiments, participants went through a vigilance task in which they were presented with frequent nontarget and rare target visual stimuli. Pictures or their corresponding verbal labels were also displayed on both target and nontarget stimuli, but participants were told that these were irrelevant to the task. They were asked to interrupt the vigilance task whenever they became aware of task-unrelated mental contents and to report them. In both experiments, more involuntary memories were elicited in the verbal cue condition, rather than in the pictorial cue condition. This result is discussed in relation to previous work that highlighted the greater effectiveness of verbal cues in memory tasks.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date 2014-10
Journal Memory & cognition
Print ISSN 0090-502X
Electronic ISSN 1532-5946
Publisher Springer Verlag
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 42
Issue 7
Pages 1076-1085
Institution Citation Mazzoni, G., Vannucci, M., & Batool, I. (2014). Manipulating cues in involuntary autobiographical memory: verbal cues are more effective than pictorial cues. Memory & cognition, 42(7), 1076-1085. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13421-014-0420-3
DOI https://doi.org/10.3758/s13421-014-0420-3
Keywords Autobiographical memory; Involuntary memories; Pictorial cues; Verbal cues
Publisher URL http://link.springer.com/article/10.3758/s13421-014-0420-3
Additional Information The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-014-0420-3

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