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Microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of carbon monolith via a soft-template method using resorcinol and formaldehyde as carbon precursor and pluronic F127 as template

Elaigwu, Sunday E.; Kyriakou, Georgios; Prior, Timothy J.; Greenway, Gillian M.

Authors

Sunday E. Elaigwu

Georgios Kyriakou

Abstract

A new microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of carbon monolith is reported in this work. The process uses microwave heating at 100 °C under acidic condition by employing a triblock copolymer F127 as the template, and resorcinol–formaldehyde as the carbon precursor. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen sorption measurements, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray studies and thermogravimetic analysis were used to characterize the synthesized material. The carbon monolith is crack-free, mesoporous and has a high surface area of 697 m²/g. The results demonstrate that the microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis is a fast and simple approach to obtain carbon monoliths, as it reduces effectively the synthesis time from hours to a few minutes which could be an advantage in the large scale production of the material.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date May 15, 2014
Journal Materials letters
Print ISSN 0167-577X
Electronic ISSN 1873-4979
Publisher Elsevier
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 123
Pages 198-201
Institution Citation Elaigwu, S. E., Kyriakou, G., Prior, T. J., & Greenway, G. M. (2014). Microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of carbon monolith via a soft-template method using resorcinol and formaldehyde as carbon precursor and pluronic F127 as template. Materials letters, 123, 198-201. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matlet.2014.03.003
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matlet.2014.03.003
Keywords Mesoporous material; Microwave; Carbon monolith; Hydrothermal
Publisher URL http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167577X14003413
Additional Information Author's accepted manuscript of article published in: Materials letters, 2014, v.123.

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Copyright Statement
© 2014, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/




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