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Biomass derived mesoporous carbon monoliths via an evaporation-induced self-assembly

Elaigwu, Sunday E.; Greenway, Gillian M.

Authors

Sunday E. Elaigwu

Abstract

Evaporation-induced self-assembly has been applied in the synthesis of crack-free mesoporous carbon monolith with good mechanical stability using a waste plant material as carbon precursor and triblock copolymer F127 as template. The carbon monolith was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption–desorption measurement, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that the carbon monolith is mesoporous, has a surface area of 219 m²/g, and a narrow pore size distribution of 6.5 nm.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date 2014-02
Journal Materials letters
Print ISSN 0167-577X
Electronic ISSN 1873-4979
Publisher Elsevier
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 115
Pages 117-120
Institution Citation Elaigwu, S. E., & Greenway, G. M. (2014). Biomass derived mesoporous carbon monoliths via an evaporation-induced self-assembly. Materials letters, 115, 117-120. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matlet.2013.10.019
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matlet.2013.10.019
Keywords Mechanical Engineering; General Materials Science; Mechanics of Materials; Condensed Matter Physics
Publisher URL http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167577X13013967
Copyright Statement © 2014, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Additional Information This article is maintained by: Elsevier; Article Title: Biomass derived mesoporous carbon monoliths via an evaporation-induced self-assembly; Journal Title: Materials Letters; CrossRef DOI link to publisher maintained version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.matlet.2013.10.019; Content Type: article; Copyright: Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Copyright Statement
© 2014, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/




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