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Straw-men and selective citation are needed to argue that associative-link formation makes no contribution to human learning

Dwyer, Dominic M.; Le Pelley, Michael E.; George, David N.; Haselgrove, Mark; Honey, Robert C.

Authors

Dominic M. Dwyer

Michael E. Le Pelley

Mark Haselgrove

Robert C. Honey



Abstract

Mitchell et al. contend that there is no need to posit a contribution based on the formation of associative links to human learning. In order to sustain this argument, they have ignored evidence which is difficult to explain with propositional accounts; and they have mischaracterised the evidence they do cite by neglecting features of these experiments that contradict a propositional account. © 2009 Cambridge University Press.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date 2009-04
Journal BEHAVIORAL AND BRAIN SCIENCES
Print ISSN 0140-525X
Electronic ISSN 1469-1825
Publisher Cambridge University Press (CUP)
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 32
Issue 2
Pages 206
APA6 Citation Dwyer, D. M., Le Pelley, M. E., George, D. N., Haselgrove, M., & Honey, R. C. (2009). Straw-men and selective citation are needed to argue that associative-link formation makes no contribution to human learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 32(2), 206. https://doi.org/10.1017/s0140525x09000946
DOI https://doi.org/10.1017/s0140525x09000946
Keywords Physiology; Behavioral Neuroscience; Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
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