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The effects of a coping intervention on coping self-efficacy, coping effectiveness, and subjective performance among adolescent soccer players

Reeves, Clive W.; Nicholls, Adam R.; McKenna, Jim

Authors

Clive W. Reeves

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Professor Adam Nicholls A.Nicholls@hull.ac.uk
Professor of Psychology/ Leader of the Sport Psychology and Coaching Group

Jim McKenna



Abstract

This study examined the effects of a coping effectiveness training for adolescent soccer players (CETASP) intervention on coping self-efficacy (CSE), coping effectiveness (CE), and subjective performance. The participants were five male soccer players aged between 13 and 14 years (M = 13.6, SD = 0.55), who played for an English Premier League Soccer Academy. A single-subject multiple-baseline, across individuals design was employed. Results suggested that participants' CSE, CE, and subjective performance improved as a result of the CETASP intervention. Additionally, the social validation findings indicated that the participants were satisfied with the development of their coping skills and enjoyed the CETASP. This study provides empirical support for a framework that applied practitioners can use in "real world" settings to develop effective coping among academy soccer players.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date 2011-06
Journal International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Print ISSN 1612-197X
Electronic ISSN 1557-251X
Publisher Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 9
Issue 2
Pages 126-142
APA6 Citation Reeves, C. W., Nicholls, A. R., & McKenna, J. (2011). The effects of a coping intervention on coping self-efficacy, coping effectiveness, and subjective performance among adolescent soccer players. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 9(2), (126-142). doi:10.1080/1612197x.2011.567104. ISSN 1612-197X
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/1612197x.2011.567104
Keywords Applied Psychology; Social Psychology