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“A most excellent medicine”: Malaria, Mithridate, and the death of Andrew Marvell (2021)
Journal Article
Mottram, S. (in press). “A most excellent medicine”: Malaria, Mithridate, and the death of Andrew Marvell. Seventeenth Century, 1-27. https://doi.org/10.1080/0268117x.2021.1901240

The poet Andrew Marvell (1621-78) died suffering from vivax malaria, a common disease in the seventeenth century, endemic in estuary regions of eastern England. This article explores Marvell’s death alongside the literature and history of malaria and... Read More about “A most excellent medicine”: Malaria, Mithridate, and the death of Andrew Marvell.

Rereading Ruins: Edmund Spenser and Scottish Presbyterianism (2020)
Book Chapter
Mottram, S. (2020). Rereading Ruins: Edmund Spenser and Scottish Presbyterianism. In A. Walsham, B. Wallace, C. Law, & B. Cummings (Eds.), Memory and the English Reformation (223-237). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

With a focus on Edmund Spenser, this chapter explores representations of ruined monasteries within (New) English protestant writing of c.1590-1642. Monastic ruins are visible mnemonics of British-Irish reformation, and protestants express surprisingl... Read More about Rereading Ruins: Edmund Spenser and Scottish Presbyterianism.

Ruin and reformation in Spenser, Shakespeare, and Marvell (2019)
Book
Mottram, S. (2019). Ruin and reformation in Spenser, Shakespeare, and Marvell. Oxford: Oxford University Press

Ruin and Reformation in Spenser, Shakespeare, and Marvell explores writerly responses to the religious violence of the long reformation in England and Wales, spanning over a century of literature and history, from the establishment of the national ch... Read More about Ruin and reformation in Spenser, Shakespeare, and Marvell.

The religious geography of Marvell’s “An Horatian Ode”: popery, presbytery, and parti-coloured picts (2018)
Journal Article
Mottram, S. (2018). The religious geography of Marvell’s “An Horatian Ode”: popery, presbytery, and parti-coloured picts. Seventeenth Century, 33(4), 441-461. https://doi.org/10.1080/0268117X.2018.1484636

Marvell’s “Ode” (1650) is an English poem about a British problem – a problem further problematized by religion. The “Ode” lauds Cromwell’s Irish and Scottish campaigns, but English responses to these “colonial” wars were in reality complicated by pr... Read More about The religious geography of Marvell’s “An Horatian Ode”: popery, presbytery, and parti-coloured picts.

Mary Hays and the Imagined Female Communities of Early Modern Europe (2017)
Book Chapter
Capern, A. (2017). Mary Hays and the Imagined Female Communities of Early Modern Europe. In G. L. Walker (Ed.), The Invention of Female Biography (174-198). Abingdon: Routledge

This research essay is appears in a collection of essays written by the subject-expert sub-editors who worked on a three year research project with a team in New York under PI Gina Luria Walker to produce a modern multi-volume edition of Mary Hay, Fe... Read More about Mary Hays and the Imagined Female Communities of Early Modern Europe.

Tasso's art and afterlives: the 'Gerusalemme liberata' in England (2017)
Book
Lawrence, J. (2017). Tasso's art and afterlives: the 'Gerusalemme liberata' in England. Manchester: Manchester University Press

This interdisciplinary book examines the literary, artistic and biographical afterlives in England of the great Italian poet Torquato Tasso, from before his death in 1595 to the end of the nineteenth century. Focusing predominantly on the impact of h... Read More about Tasso's art and afterlives: the 'Gerusalemme liberata' in England.