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An investigation of gender and age differences in academic motivation and classroom behaviour in adolescents

Bugler, Myfanwy; McGeown, Sarah; St Clair-Thompson, Helen

Authors

Myfanwy Bugler

Sarah McGeown

Helen St Clair-Thompson

Abstract

This study investigated gender- and age-related differences in academic motivation and classroom behaviour in adolescents. Eight hundred and fifty-five students (415 girls and 440 boys) aged 11–16 (M age = 13.96, SD = 1.47) filled in a questionnaire that examined student academic motivation and teachers completed a questionnaire reporting student classroom behaviour. Interestingly, early adolescent boys’ (11–12 years) self-reported academic motivation was significantly more closely associated with reports of student classroom behaviour completed by teachers. However, a surprising result was the significant drop in girls’ adaptive motivation from early to mid-adolescence (13–14 years) and a significant increase in mid-adolescence (13–14 years). Furthermore, teachers reported a significant increase in negative classroom behaviour in mid-adolescent and late adolescent girls (15–16 years). The need to further understand the association between academic motivation and classroom behaviour at different stages in adolescence, and to design interventions to improve classroom behaviour, is deliberated.

Publication Date Aug 8, 2016
Journal Educational psychology
Print ISSN 0144-3410
Electronic ISSN 1469-5820
Publisher Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 36
Issue 7
Pages 1196-1218
Institution Citation Bugler, M., McGeown, S., & St Clair-Thompson, H. (2016). An investigation of gender and age differences in academic motivation and classroom behaviour in adolescents. Educational psychology, 36(7), 1196-1218. https://doi.org/10.1080/01443410.2015.1035697
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/01443410.2015.1035697
Keywords Adolescents; Gender; Age; Motivation; Behaviour
Publisher URL http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01443410.2015.1035697#.Vd19bPmN10E
Copyright Statement ©2016 University of Hull
Additional Information This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Educational psychology on 07/05/2015, available online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01443410.2015.1035697

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