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Exercise-induced dehydration alters pulmonary function but does not modify airway responsiveness to dry air in athletes with mild asthma

Simpson, A. J.; Romer, L. M.; Kippelen, P.

Authors

L. M. Romer

P. Kippelen



Abstract

Local airway water loss is the main physiological trigger for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). Our aim was to investigate the effects of whole body water loss on airway responsiveness and pulmonary function in athletes with mild asthma and/or EIB. Ten recreational athletes with a medical diagnosis of mild asthma and/or EIB completed a randomized, crossover study. Pulmonary function tests, including spirometry, whole body plethysmography, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DlCO), were conducted before and after three conditions: 1) 2 h of exercise in the heat with no fluid intake (dehydration), 2) 2 h of exercise with ad libitum fluid intake (control), and 3) a time-matched rest period (rest). Airway responsiveness was assessed 2 h postexercise/rest via eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea (EVH) to dry air. Exercise in the heat with no fluid intake induced a state of mild dehydration, with a body mass loss of 2.3 ± 0.8% (SD). After EVH, airway narrowing was not different between conditions: median (interquartile range) maximum fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s was 13 (7–15)%, 11 (9–24)%, and 12 (7–20)% in dehydration, control, and rest conditions, respectively. Dehydration caused a significant reduction in forced vital capacity (300 ± 190 ml, P = 0.001) and concomitant increases in residual volume (260 ± 180 ml, P = 0.001) and functional residual capacity (260 ± 250 ml, P = 0.011), with no change in DlCO. Mild exercise-induced dehydration does not exaggerate airway responsiveness to dry air in athletes with mild asthma/EIB but may affect small airway function.

Citation

Simpson, A. J., Romer, L. M., & Kippelen, P. (2017). Exercise-induced dehydration alters pulmonary function but does not modify airway responsiveness to dry air in athletes with mild asthma. Journal of Applied Physiology, 122(5), 1329-1335. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.01114.2016

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Mar 8, 2017
Online Publication Date May 18, 2017
Publication Date May 1, 2017
Deposit Date Nov 23, 2017
Publicly Available Date Nov 29, 2017
Journal Journal of Applied Physiology
Print ISSN 8750-7587
Electronic ISSN 1522-1601
Publisher American Physiological Society
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 122
Issue 5
Pages 1329-1335
DOI https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.01114.2016
Keywords Airway hyperresponsiveness; Eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea; Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction; Exercise-induced asthma; Whole body dehydration
Public URL https://hull-repository.worktribe.com/output/424456
Publisher URL http://jap.physiology.org/content/122/5/1329
Copyright Statement Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society
Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution CC-BY 3.0: © the American Physiological Society.

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