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Changes in body composition in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction initiated on beta-blocker therapy

Ingle, Lee; Rigby, Alan S.; Carroll, Sean; Butterly, Ron; King, Rod F.; Cooke, Carlton B.; Cleland, John G.J.F.; Clark, Andrew L.

Authors

Alan S. Rigby

Ron Butterly

Rod F. King

Carlton B. Cooke

John G.J.F. Cleland

Andrew L. Clark



Abstract

Background: Increasing body mass index, cholesterol and body fat are associated with a better prognosis in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD). Beta-blocker usage is associated with changes in body composition and increased body fat. The present study investigated 12-month changes in body composition in patients with LVSD initiated on beta-blocker therapy. Methods: The relation between beta-blocker use and body composition was evaluated in 91 patients (75% male) with LVSD. Body composition was assessed by bioelectrical impedance. Results: Seventeen patients died during the study period. There was no statistical difference among beta-blocker usage, beta-blocker type, or changes in body fat, basal metabolic rate, impedance, fat-free mass, fat mass and total body water. There were no significant differences between any of these measures and beta-blocker usage. Conclusion: After 12 months, changes in body composition were not found to be influenced by initiation of beta-blocker therapy in patients with LVSD. © 2007 Pulsus Group Inc. All rights reserved.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Apr 19, 2007
Journal Experimental and Clinical Cardiology
Print ISSN 1205-6626
Publisher Cardiology Academic Press
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 12
Issue 1
Pages 46-47
APA6 Citation Ingle, L., Rigby, A. S., Carroll, S., Butterly, R., King, R. F., Cooke, C. B., …Clark, A. L. (2007). Changes in body composition in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction initiated on beta-blocker therapy. Experimental and Clinical Cardiology, 12(1), 46-47
Keywords Body fat; Chronic heart failure; Fat-free mass; Fat mass
Additional Information https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2359626/