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The kinin–kallikrein system: physiological roles, pathophysiology and its relationship to cancer biomarkers

Kashuba, Elena; Bailey, James; Allsup, David; Cawkwell, Lynn

Authors

Elena Kashuba

James Bailey

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Dr David Allsup D.J.Allsup@hull.ac.uk
Senior Lecturer in Haematology and Honorary Consultant



Abstract

The kinin–kallikrein system (KKS) is an endogenous multiprotein cascade, the activation of which leads to triggering of the intrinsic coagulation pathway and enzymatic hydrolysis of kininogens with the consequent release of bradykinin-related peptides. This system plays a crucial role in inflammation, vasodilation, smooth muscle contraction, cardioprotection, vascular permeability, blood pressure control, coagulation and pain. In this review, we will outline the physiology and pathophysiology of the KKS and also highlight the association of this system with carcinogenesis and cancer progression.

Journal Article Type Review
Publication Date May 29, 2013
Journal Biomarkers
Print ISSN 1354-750X
Electronic ISSN 1366-5804
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 18
Issue 4
Pages 279-296
APA6 Citation Kashuba, E., Bailey, J., Allsup, D., & Cawkwell, L. (2013). The kinin–kallikrein system: physiological roles, pathophysiology and its relationship to cancer biomarkers. Biomarkers, 18(4), (279-296). doi:10.3109/1354750x.2013.787544. ISSN 1354-750X
DOI https://doi.org/10.3109/1354750x.2013.787544
Keywords Clinical Biochemistry; Biochemistry; Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
Publisher URL https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/1354750X.2013.787544