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Contingent learning for creative music technologists

King, Andrew

Authors

Dr Andrew King A.King@hull.ac.uk
Senior Lecturer in Music and Technology/ Head of School



Abstract

This article will review educational literature relevant to the design and implementation of a learning technology interface (LTI) into an undergraduate music technology curriculum. It also explores through empirical enquiry some of the advantages and disadvantages of using learning technology. This case study adopted a social-constructivist viewpoint; learners were placed in groups to complete a set task. Activity in learning (such as guided discovery learning or experiential learning) has long been viewed as key to cognitive development. The LTI was developed to enable contingent learning (i.e., learning at a time of need) to students carrying out a practical task in the music studio. The use of the LTI was compared to the use of a traditional paper-based manual, as students worked collaboratively in pairs to complete a drum-kit recording. Observations on student activity were made via multiple camera recordings, while student feedback about the support materials and collaborative exercise was collected in a questionnaire. Results indicated that the students using LTI group were able to resolve problems more effectively and efficiently than the manual (control) group. In addition, how and when the students used the different types of support material demonstrated that the LTI could provide a better grounding for novices. Feedback also indicated that the students were more likely to use the LTI for technical support, and it was easier to retrieve information than from the manual.

Journal Article Type Review
Publication Date Jul 1, 2009
Journal TECHNOLOGY PEDAGOGY AND EDUCATION
Print ISSN 1475-939X
Electronic ISSN 1747-5139
Publisher Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 18
Issue 2
Pages 137-153
APA6 Citation King, A. (2009). Contingent learning for creative music technologists. Technology, Pedagogy and Education, 18(2), 137-153. doi:10.1080/14759390902992550
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/14759390902992550
Keywords contingent learning music technology education
Publisher URL https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14759390902992550