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Individualisation of time-motion analysis : a method comparison and case report series

Hunter, F.; Towlson, C.; Smith, M.; Madden, J.; Hunter, F.; Bray, J.; Towlson, C.; Smith, M.; Barrett, S.; Madden, J.; Abt, G.; Lovell, R.

Authors

F. Hunter

C. Towlson

M. Smith

J. Madden

F. Hunter

Dr James Bray J.Bray@hull.ac.uk
Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Nutrition

M. Smith

S. Barrett

J. Madden

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Dr Grant Abt G.Abt@hull.ac.uk
Reader in Sport and Exercise Physiology and Head of Department for Sport, Health and Exercise Science

R. Lovell

Abstract

© Georg Thieme Verlag KG. This study compared the intensity distribution of time-motion analysis data, when speed zones were categorized by different methods. 12 U18 players undertook a routine battery of laboratory- and field-based assessments to determine their running speed corresponding to the respiratory compensation threshold (RCT), maximal aerobic speed (MAS), maximal oxygen consumption (vVO 2max ) and maximal sprint speed (MSS). Players match-demands were tracked using 5 Hz GPS units in 22 fixtures (50 eligible match observations). The percentage of total distance covered running at high-speed (%HSR), very-high speed (%VHSR) and sprinting were determined using the following speed thresholds: 1) arbitrary; 2) individualised (IND) using RCT, vVO 2max and MSS; 3) individualised via MAS per se; 4) individualised via MSS per se; and 5) individualised using MAS and MSS as measures of locomotor capacities (LOCO). Using MSS in isolation resulted in 61 % and 39 % of player's % HSR and % VHSR, respectively, being incorrectly interpreted, when compared to the IND technique. Estimating the RCT from fractional values of MAS resulted in erroneous interpretations of % HSR in 50 % of cases. The present results suggest that practitioners and researchers should avoid using singular fitness characteristics to individualise the intensity distribution of time-motion analysis data. A combination of players' anaerobic threshold, MAS, and MSS characteristics are recommended to individualise player-tracking data.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date 2015
Journal International journal of sports medicine
Print ISSN 0172-4622
Electronic ISSN 1439-3964
Publisher Thieme Open
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 36
Issue 1
Pages 41-48
Institution Citation Hunter, F., Bray, J., Towlson, C., Smith, M., Barrett, S., Madden, J., …Lovell, R. (2015). Individualisation of time-motion analysis : a method comparison and case report series. International journal of sports medicine, 36(1), 41-48. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0034-1384547
DOI https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0034-1384547
Keywords External load, Fitness characteristics, GPS, Match-demands, Soccer, Intensity-distribution
Publisher URL https://www.thieme-connect.de/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0034-1384547
Copyright Statement ©2015 University of Hull
Additional Information Authors' accepted manuscript of an article which has been published in: International journal of sports medicine, 2014, v.36, issue 1 at: https://www.thieme-conn...?10.1055/s-0034-1384547

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